Heritage Award for Kensington Market: Hidden Histories Students!

Student researchers for Kensington Market: Hidden Histories augmented reality app recognized with Lieutenant Governer’s Youth Achievement Ontario Heritage Award

Canadian Studies students received a Lieutenant Governor’s Ontario Heritage Award for Youth Achievement, presented by the Honourable Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario (second from right) and Harvey McCue, Chair of the Ontario Heritage Trust (far right).(Ian Crysler, courtesy of the Ontario Heritage Trust)

My UoT students received the Lieutenant Governor’s Ontario Heritage Award for Youth Achievement from the Ontario Heritage Trust 2017!

I was absolutely delighted & honoured to attend the Lieutenant Governor’s Ontario Heritage Award Ceremony at Queen’s Park, Feb. 23, 2017, where students from my Canadian Studies course were given the award by Lieutenant Governor Elizabeth Dowdeswell and Ontario Heritage Trust chair Harvey McCue.

The story is now featured on the UoT Faculty of Arts & Science homepage. A few excerpts from Sean Bettam’s article:

“The Kensington Market: Hidden Histories app, which guides users through a dynamic tour of 12 locations in Toronto’s historic Kensington Market and brings to life the layers of stories embedded in the area, was made possible by students in University College’s Digital Tools in a Canadian Context course. A companion online interactive map archives histories of a total of 32 locations.”

“Receiving this award felt like it wasn’t just recognizing us students, but also the sites and locations in Kensington Market featured in our project,” said fourth-year student Arabhi Ratnajothy. “It is a reminder that so much of this city was built by immigrants who engrained themselves and their stories into the paths walked by today’s generations. We move towards the future by remembering the past.”

“Being selected for this award is such a terrific boost and affirmation for each of the students,” said course instructor Siobhan O’Flynn. “Having the opportunity to work on a project, be engaged in original research and contribute to the safeguarding of our city’s intangible cultural heritage as undergraduates is remarkable.”

“Throughout my years in the Canadian Studies program, I was always impressed by the fascinating research projects we were able to take part in with some amazing professors,” said recent graduate Nicole Paroyan. “I am so glad that a project spearheaded by Professor O’Flynn was recognized this way. None of this would have been possible without her.”

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Kensington Market: Hidden Histories on Metro Morning with Nicole Paroyan

Our student, Nicole Paroyan, had a terrific exchange with Matt Galloway on Metro Morning this am! It’s been an honour & a pleasure to work with Nicole & our other stellar students on this project!

Audio clip here!

Kensington Market: Hidden Histories is available for download on iTunes!

Search Kensington Hidden Histories! (oh Apple we have too many characters!)

And in the Google Play as Kensington Market: Hidden Histories.

Download & enjoy walking through Kensington Market discovering layers of lives lived, communities that flourished and moved on, some leaving traces. Others now vanished.. We barely scratched the surface!

KM:hh Featured on UoT’s home page as latest news!

Repeat of the story by Peter Boisseau, but on the main UoT page!

Excerpt: “An augmented reality app that guides users through a dynamic tour of key locations in Toronto’s historic Kensington Market is now available for free download – thanks to U of T students in the Faculty of Arts & Science.

Students enrolled in University College’s ‘Digital Tools in a Canadian Context’ course used original research and archival documents to unearth generations of Kensington Market’s vibrant legacy and transform it into an interactive database.

“Kensington Market is a microcosm of factors that have contributed to Toronto’s richness as one of the world’s most multicultural city, and reveals how Canada has changed over time,” says course instructor Siobhan O’Flynn, a lecturer in Canadian studies.

This is the latest example of how U of T students and researchers are taking the classroom to the city – and in particular to Kensington Market – to learn more about Toronto’s vibrant culture. The neighbourhood has also served as a way to introduce international students to the city….”